Author Archive for Keri Bryan

Rainy Season News

We arrived at Bois Jolie to find these cute little guys so newly sprouted that they were still holding on to their seed coats.

On Tuesday Dr. McGrath, Sega, Ford, Linnea and I arrived in Cange once again excited to check in on how things have progressed in Bois Jolie since our last visit. I had been back to Bois Jolie once since our big trip over spring break, but it was still to early for the coffee seedlings… more →

Spring Break: Enket

Parcels of Participant families are shown in green, the portion of their land that they indicated they would like to dedicate to growing coffee is shown in yellow.

The final major component of our spring break trip was the interviews we conducted with Haitian families. These interview involved collecting baseline socioeconomic and environmental data, basic family information that will be required to register families to sell carbon offsets, information on current land use and coffee and tree planting preferences. We also created geo-referenced… more →

Spring Break: Nursery Construction

we flattened the nursery area by building a terrace wall and moving earth around with any available "tool."

As a part of spring break, we worked together with Haitian families to construct a coffee nursery. The coffee will grow in the nursery for about two years. During those two years, we will focus on planting fruit trees and other trees that farmers prefer to create an over-story to provide shade for the coffee… more →

Spring Break: Student Exchange

Jonathan Salazar explains how a clinometer uses trigonometry to measure the height of a tree from the ground at a set distance away from the tree.

Over spring break, a portion of the Outreach Program trip came to Cange to work with Dr. McGrath, Johnathan Salazar, and I. One of the primary goals of this project is to facilitate student educational opportunities surrounding offset generation, and this trip piloting an educational partnership between Sewanee and the Centre de Formation Fritz LaFontant… more →

Spring Break and PES Project Goals

Maxo, Keri, Deborah and Bosque at CFFL

After a long but action-packed break from blogging, I am returning with a lot of news of progress made since my last post. As a recap, a team at Sewanee, including Dr. Deborah McGrath, myself (Keri Bryan), and Jonathan Salazar, are working together with our long-term collaborators in Haiti, Zamni Agrikol (ZA, a sister organization of Partners… more →

Community Forum

Fereste held the attention of the members of his hometown with his charm and enthusiasm. Here he is explaining that carbon dioxide is like a "poison to the atmosphere" that many people are will to pay to have removed.

After a long stint of crunching numbers and writing proposals and grants since I returned from Haiti in October, I traveled to Cange once again last week with Dr. Deborah McGrath, Pradip Malde, and Will Watson for a brief trip that turned out to be a whirlwind of productivity. In an effort to distill some… more →

Boucan Carre

This Wednesday and Thursday Daniel and I had the amazing opportunity to travel into an extremely rural part of Haiti, to some of the most distant families served by Zanmi Agrikol’s Family Assistance Program. The locations we visited were called Nan Chambo, La Croix, and Boule, and we also met with representative groups from Decide… more →

In Haiti!

After a long day of travel Daniel and I arrived in Cange Sunday evening. It is cooler and more lush than when I came in the spring, which was during the tail end  of the dry season. I find myself woken each morning by strange bird called and the growing murmurs of voices coming from the… more →

PES Project History

Haiti is the one of the most impoverished countries in the western hemisphere, and Haiti’s people suffer the highest rates of malnutrition, infant mortality, and maternal mortality in the Americas.  Malnutrition functions as a root cause of other health concerns; thus, any long-term strategies to improve health must address the issues underlying food insecurity. Malnutrition… more →